I think I’d like to job-share

I
recently had a new addition to my family and am finding it difficult to juggle
my work and domestic responsibilities. One possible solution is a job share
with another HR manager and I have discussed this with a colleague in another
organisation who is thinking along the same lines. Is this realistic and how do
we go about it?

Margaret
Malpas, joint managing director, Malpas Flexible Learning, writes:

Often
employers who have job sharers say they were sceptical at first but have found
it an excellent experience. First work out whether you can work with the other
person – you  are going to need to have
the same values about being organised, communicating and not letting each other
down. If this all looks good, then put together a plan and the benefits which
will sell it to your  manager

Peter
Lewis, consultant, Chiumento Consulting Group, writes:

Job
share is an option if you have found a reliable, like-minded colleague; but
there are a few issues you should consider. The first is availability of the
right organisation, the right role and the right balance for you both. Check
out what job share jobs are being advertised in the personnel magazines; and
ask the specialist HR recruiters to let you know what kind of job share
positions they are handling. They should be able to give you advice on the
state of the market for job share HR roles.

The
increasing trend towards outsourcing parts of the HR function means that there
are  opportunities to work as a
self-employment consultant, which may give you the flexibility of hours that
you are looking for. Options include joining a consultancy, either on a
part-time or associate basis, or the two of you could offer HR services based
upon your mix of skills.

Jo
Selby, associate director, EJ Human Resources, writes:

Firstly,
congratulations on your new arrival.  

In
response to your question, job share is one option and a solution that is
becoming more common.  However, the
viability of such a solution is something you and your employers will need to
explore.

Before
discussing this with them, I would advise you to think through the pros and
cons of a job share, both from your and your employer’s perspective.  You may wish to consider some of the
practicalities: who would be the other half of the job share, sharing the role
and responsibilities, communication between the two job holders etc. as well as
the financial implications for yourself.  

If,
having thought it through thoroughly, you see it is as being viable, I suggest
you discuss your proposal with your employers and see if this is something they
are able to accommodate.

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