Ten ways to survive redundancy

Careers
consultancy Penna Sanders & Sidney offers ten tips to help cope with
redundancy.

Keep
confident

Don’t
let layoffs intimidate you. The job market is not as bad as cynics would have
you believe. No matter what the economic landscape looks like, talented and
skilled managers are always in demand.

Network,
network, network

The
majority of jobseekers use personal contacts and networking to find a new job.
Build a strong network by keeping in touch with personal and professional
contacts and by joining industry associations. Attend industry functions and
cold call the companies you want to work for. The more people you speak to, the
more opportunities open up.

Re-evaluate
you career

Redundancy
can be the perfect opportunity to try a new career path. Use a career
management service to take assessment tests and determine which
responsibilities you are best suited to. You may surprise yourself by finding
your skills, personality characteristics and work style are better suited to a
totally different job.

Balance
your ideas against what you can afford to do

Maybe
you can afford to do voluntary work, take time out abroad or go freelance.
Maybe you can’t. Investigate and add up the total cost of your plans, then look
at future sources of income. If in doubt, seek professional financial advice.

Update
your CV

This
is the key that can open doors and it must reflect your most recent
achievements. Make sure it’s the best it can be by consulting careers services
and websites who offer advice on CV writing.

Research
the market

Getting
hold of information about industries and potential employers is no longer the
hard slog it once was. The Internet offers a vast array of resources and you
can use it to find details about job responsibilities, corporate culture and
company financial information.

Keep
learning

Whether
it’s in your personal life – a cookery course or learning to play an instrument
– or a professional skill, for example, getting to grips with technology,
employers like employees who have a thirst and aptitude for learning new
skills.

Know
yourself and your background

This
is not as straightforward as it sounds. Get to know your CV like the back of
your hand and understand every aspect of your work history. Rehearse your accomplishments
and know why they were important to your company.

Stay
on top

Keep
abreast of news and trends in your field by reading newspapers, trade journals,
industry publications and web sites. Consider taking a short course to put you
at the cutting edge of your field.

Follow
up your contacts

Be
responsive to all the people you’ve spoken to along the way – those you’ve
asked for help, the people who’ve interviewed you… Don’t be afraid to ask
difficult questions – what you learn may land you your next position.

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