TUC calls for better race regulations for job applicants

The
TUC has called for tighter race regulation on the job market after a survey
suggested discrimination was still a major problem faced by applicants from
ethnic minorities.

The
undercover survey of 50 employers implied that white candidates stood a better
chance of securing an interview than black or Asian people with similar
qualifications.

General
secretary Brendan Barber said the survey showed again why it was necessary for
the Government to change the laws regulating the job market.

BBC
Radio 5 Live spent several months sending firms CVs from six fictitious
applicants – three men and three women.

Two
of the candidates were given traditionally ‘white’ names, two had black African
names and the final applicants were given Muslim names.

The
employers were selected at random and included many well-known firms looking to
fill vacancies across a range of fields.

All
the applicants were given the same standard in terms of qualifications and
experience, but CVs were written and presented differently to increase their
authenticity.

While
a fifth of the applications by the white ‘candidates’ resulted in interview
offers, only 9 per cent of the Muslim applications received similar responses.

Meanwhile,
13 per cent of the letters from the black ‘candidates’ prompted offers of an
interview from the firms concerned.

Barber
said public sector organisations currently faced tougher rules over job
applications and their procedures were vetted to minimise discrimination.

The
CBI employers’ body is not in favour of further race legislation.

By Mike Berry

Comments are closed.