Vexatious claims

Employment tribunals can make awards for costs against a party who has acted “vexatiously, abusively, disruptively, or otherwise unreasonably” or if the claim is “misconceived”. This could be where a party has failed to comply with tribunal orders, behaved badly at the hearing or brought what is obviously a hopeless case.

In extreme cases, applications can be made to ban individuals who habitually bring vexatious claims against employers from bringing further employment tribunal claims. For example, restriction of proceedings orders were made in Her Majesty's Attorney General v Groves (19 claims in five years) and Her Majesty's Attorney General v Iteshi (30 employment cases in four years).


Push for tribunal cash

1 Jun 2000

The raised ceiling on unfair dismissal payouts is encouraging aggrieved
employees to push for a tribunal hearing in the hope...

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Getting the sums right

1 Jun 2000

Employment awards are on the up.  But
how and why do tribunals arrive at the figures they do?  Mary Clarke...

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Multiple-claim trend puts employers to legal test

9 May 2000

Staff are increasingly throwing as many allegations as they can at employers
to give them the best chance of winning...

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Walker case – employer duty

29 Feb 2000

Letters of the week
• Your article on the Walker case (15 February) covers an interesting topic
but I do...

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