Tag Archives | organisational-development

Manners matter

Shared from on 12 July 2015

I usually open doors for people. My mum brought me up to be disciplined about saying ‘please’ and ‘thank you’. My emails generally start with a friendly greeting and end with an appropriate sign-off: ‘Hiya’ and ‘All the best’ seem to be my personal default setting, rather than the curt ‘Kevin’ that sounds like the […]

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Manners matter

Shared from on 12 July 2015

I usually open doors for people. My mum brought me up to be disciplined about saying ‘please’ and ‘thank you’. My emails generally start with a friendly greeting and end with an appropriate sign-off: ‘Hiya’ and ‘All the best’ seem to be my personal default setting, rather than the curt ‘Kevin’ that sounds like the […]

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The price of everything, the value of nothing

Shared from on 29 March 2015

Writing in the FT this weekend, food writer Tim Hayward identifies the subtle feelings provoked when quality restaurateurs outsource parts of their production. It reminded me of a conversation I had in Madrid a couple of weeks ago and made me curious about how organisations engage in moving production and service around the world. The paradox the FT article […]

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The price of everything, the value of nothing

Shared from on 29 March 2015

Writing in the FT this weekend, food writer Tim Hayward identifies the subtle feelings provoked when quality restaurateurs outsource parts of their production. It reminded me of a conversation I had in Madrid a couple of weeks ago and made me curious about how organisations engage in moving production and service around the world. The paradox the FT article […]

Continue Reading

The price of everything, the value of nothing

Shared from on 29 March 2015

Writing in the FT this weekend, food writer Tim Hayward identifies the subtle feelings provoked when quality restaurateurs outsource parts of their production. It reminded me of a conversation I had in Madrid a couple of weeks ago and made me curious about how organisations engage in moving production and service around the world. The paradox the FT article […]

Continue Reading

The price of everything, the value of nothing

Shared from on 29 March 2015

Writing in the FT this weekend, food writer Tim Hayward identifies the subtle feelings provoked when quality restaurateurs outsource parts of their production. It reminded me of a conversation I had in Madrid a couple of weeks ago and made me curious about how organisations engage in moving production and service around the world. The paradox the FT article […]

Continue Reading

The price of everything, the value of nothing

Shared from on 29 March 2015

Writing in the FT this weekend, food writer Tim Hayward identifies the subtle feelings provoked when quality restaurateurs outsource parts of their production. It reminded me of a conversation I had in Madrid a couple of weeks ago and made me curious about how organisations engage in moving production and service around the world. The paradox the FT article […]

Continue Reading

The price of everything, the value of nothing

Shared from on 29 March 2015

Writing in the FT this weekend, food writer Tim Hayward identifies the subtle feelings provoked when quality restaurateurs outsource parts of their production. It reminded me of a conversation I had in Madrid a couple of weeks ago and made me curious about how organisations engage in moving production and service around the world. The paradox the FT article […]

Continue Reading

The price of everything, the value of nothing

Shared from on 29 March 2015

Writing in the FT this weekend, food writer Tim Hayward identifies the subtle feelings provoked when quality restaurateurs outsource parts of their production. It reminded me of a conversation I had in Madrid a couple of weeks ago and made me curious about how organisations engage in moving production and service around the world. The paradox the FT article […]

Continue Reading

Boundless Curiosity

Shared from on 25 February 2015

I found this article the other day from Diane Coyle (@diane1859). She points to a 1959 controversy sparked by CP Snow’s observation about a preference in English education for Humanities over Sciences and a consequential lack of scientific literacy in the society of the time. It got me curious, particularly in the light of this brilliant piece from Wait but Why and some recent politics […]

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Boundless Curiosity

Shared from on 25 February 2015

I found this article the other day from Diane Coyle (@diane1859). She points to a 1959 controversy sparked by CP Snow’s observation about a preference in English education for Humanities over Sciences and a consequential lack of scientific literacy in the society of the time. It got me curious, particularly in the light of this brilliant piece from Wait but Why and some recent politics […]

Continue Reading

Boundless Curiosity

Shared from on 25 February 2015

I found this article the other day from Diane Coyle (@diane1859). She points to a 1959 controversy sparked by CP Snow’s observation about a preference in English education for Humanities over Sciences and a consequential lack of scientific literacy in the society of the time. It got me curious, particularly in the light of this brilliant piece from Wait but Why and some recent politics […]

Continue Reading

Boundless Curiosity

Shared from on 25 February 2015

I found this article the other day from Diane Coyle (@diane1859). She points to a 1959 controversy sparked by CP Snow’s observation about a preference in English education for Humanities over Sciences and a consequential lack of scientific literacy in the society of the time. It got me curious, particularly in the light of this brilliant piece from Wait but Why and some recent politics […]

Continue Reading

Boundless Curiosity

Shared from on 25 February 2015

I found this article the other day from Diane Coyle (@diane1859). She points to a 1959 controversy sparked by CP Snow’s observation about a preference in English education for Humanities over Sciences and a consequential lack of scientific literacy in the society of the time. It got me curious, particularly in the light of this brilliant piece from Wait but Why and some recent politics […]

Continue Reading

Boundless Curiosity

Shared from on 25 February 2015

I found this article the other day from Diane Coyle (@diane1859). She points to a 1959 controversy sparked by CP Snow’s observation about a preference in English education for Humanities over Sciences and a consequential lack of scientific literacy in the society of the time. It got me curious, particularly in the light of this brilliant piece from Wait but Why and some recent politics […]

Continue Reading