Gender pay gap

Gender pay gap reporting legislation requires large employers to publish their overall mean and median gender pay gaps from 2018. Under the new laws, private and voluntary sector employers with 250 or more employees have to calculate their gender pay gap on 5 April each year, publishing their data on the Government’s gender pay gap reporting service by 4 April the following year. For public sector organisations, the snapshot date is 31 March, so the data has to be published no later than 30 March the following year.

Top 10 HR questions December 2016: GPG reporting and GDPR

3 Jan 2017

The Government published a revised version of the draft Regulations setting out the gender pay gap (GPG) reporting duty on...

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Employment law cases 2017: seven decisions to look out for

14 Dec 2016

We round up seven significant employment law decisions expected in 2017, with cases pending on employment status, equal pay, whistleblowing,...

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Failure to report gender pay gap could result in more than reputational damage

7 Dec 2016

Employers could face legal consequences if they fail to comply with the new gender pay gap rules, which were published...

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2017 employment law changes: are you ready?

Employment law changes 2017: eight priorities for HR

7 Dec 2016

Significant employment law changes are anticipated for 2017, amid the ongoing uncertainty resulting from the Brexit referendum.
Large compliance projects...

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Gender pay gap reporting: five things you need to know

6 Dec 2016

A new duty requiring big employers to publish data on their gender pay gaps now looks set to come into...

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Gender pay gap and equal pay: what’s the difference?

10 Nov 2016

Today, 10 November 2016, is Equal Pay Day, the day of the year on which women effectively stop earning money...

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Five questions to ask when addressing gender equality

21 Oct 2016

Gender pay gap reporting is just the start of tackling gender diversity, argues KPMG’s Ingrid Waterfield. It’s the action that...

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Women earn £8,500 less than men by their 50s

14 Oct 2016

Women earn less than men throughout their working lives and the gap is widest in their 50s when they earn...

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Finance firms commit to 50/50 gender split in senior roles by 2021

11 Oct 2016

Thirteen finance companies, including Legal & General and Virgin Money, are aiming to have complete gender parity in senior roles...

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glass-ceiling

Never mind the glass ceiling, what about the glass door?

11 Oct 2016

So much has been written about why women earn less than men and miss out on key promotions. But, as...

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Top 10 HR questions September 2016: Tax-free Childcare

4 Oct 2016

Questions on Tax-free Childcare, the apprenticeship levy and gender pay gap reporting were the most popular FAQs on XpertHR in...

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Employment law changes: October 2016 and beyond

15 Sep 2016

The autumn months promise to be a busy period for HR practitioners as they get to grips with a host...

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Male managers more likely to be promoted than women

23 Aug 2016

Women continue to receive fewer promotions and earn less than men, according to the latest National Management Survey from XpertHR...

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Public-sector gender pay gap reporting confirmed

19 Aug 2016

The timetable for gender pay gap reporting in the public sector has been confirmed, with the Government largely intending to...

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Gender pay gap reporting moves a step closer

15 Aug 2016

The Government has given a strong indication that it intends to plough ahead with gender pay gap reporting obligations, after...

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