Occupational health news in brief

Skin lookout


Staff are being advised to keep an eye out for any changes to their skin, especially the growth of new moles or changes to existing moles, particularly after they return from holiday. The Royal College of Physicians and British Association of Dermatologists have issued new guidelines to help physicians, GPs and other healthcare professionals spot the signs of melanoma and treat it quickly.


Stress leads to depression


Stressed workers are much more likely to experience serious depression. A study of more than 24,000 staff in Canada, reported in the American Journal of Public Health, found nearly 5% suffered from depression in the past year, with those under heavy stress at work at increased risk.


Workers take ‘sickies’ to recover from holidays


More than a quarter of British workers take at least one extra day off work to recover from their holiday, according to research by travel website Travelsupermarket.com. The poll of 1,000 people found 27% had taken a ‘buffer day’ at the end of a holiday, with only one-third telling their employer the real reason for their absence.


Does boxing really lead to chronic brain injury?


It is impossible to prove or reject the theory that amateur boxing leads to chronic brain injury, a study in the British Medical Journal has argued. A team at Northwick Park Hospital, in Harrow, north London, found that in 36 studies of amateur boxing and chronic traumatic brain injury, relevant abnormalities were present in just 42%, and the quality of evidence was generally poor.


http://press.psprings.co.uk/bmj/october/amateurboxing.pdf





 

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