Workers would resort to lies to win big at tribunals

More
than eight out of 10 of workers (85 per cent) would lie to increase the chance
of winning a big payout at an employment tribunal, according to a new survey.

The
research by employment law firm Peninsula also found that 88 per cent of those
surveyed would consider making a tribunal claim.

In
1995, only a third (34 per cent) of staff said they would consider tribunal
action if they felt they were being treated unfairly.

Peter
Done, managing director of Peninsula, said extensive media coverage meant
employees know their rights, what they consist of, how to use them to their
advantage and get the most out of any slip by an employer.

“If
there was a more open culture within organisations, then problems may be nipped
in the bud at the time, as opposed to developing into court cases and costly,
time-consuming tribunal procedures,” he said.

The
survey also found:


86 per cent said they had considered taking their bosses to a tribunal in the
past


18 per cent said they believed their employer understood all their rights as an
employee


94 per cent have had a serious workplace argument or dispute with their manager
or employer, but in only a third of cases was it resolved to their satisfaction


87 per cent of workers said their main incentive for going to a tribunal would
be to make more money, rather than to make a point


47 per cent said they would accept an out-of-court settlement.

By Michael Millar

Comments are closed.