Company loyalty low on employee priority list

A
third of employees have done something at work that they didn’t want to in the
hope of a promotion or bonus, according to new research.

However,
the research by Black Mountain, an HR outsourcing company, shows that nearly
half of all employees (42 per cent) have no loyalty and would leave their
current employment at the earliest opportunity if they were offered a job for
the same financial rewards and job position, but for a ‘better’ employer.

The
survey also shows that more than 50 per cent of workers believe bonuses are
awarded for subjective rather than objective reasons.

Tim
Evans, director of Black Mountain, said: 
“As the job market continues to become more about ‘survival of the
fittest’ rather than a ‘job for life’, we all seem more prepared to do things
we don’t want in order to ensure that we are still in the hunt.

"This
can only be exacerbated by the knowledge that any bonus you receive will be on
the whim of your manager rather than based on your actual performance, often a
frustrating and de-motivating experience if you and your manager don’t see eye-to-eye.   

“The
days of the loyal employee are dead, the old boy network is in decline and we
have all become followers of our own goals, rather than workers for the goal of
our employer. Perhaps better communication between employer and employee, including
more transparent bonus schemes, could be one way to ensure the loyalty of us
all in the future.”

By Quentin Reade

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