Air safety via the web

Simon
Kent searches the internet to find out what information is available on flight
safety

Surf
the web for flight safety information and it won’t be too long before the
events of 11 September cause a seemingly informative website to slip into
personal – and often extreme – opinion. Head for the Airline Pilot’s Security
Alliance, which runs www.secure-skies.org and you have the opportunity to add
your name to the petition to give pilots firearms – a somewhat debatable idea
of ‘secure skies’. The other hazard is that your quest for assurance results in
increased anxiety concerning this method of transport. Airclaims’ site –
www.waasinfo.net – will either calm or increase these fears with its Fatal
Airline Accident database, searchable by airline name (name your carrier and
read how their last passengers were killed). For training or information,
whatever the problem ñ human factors, fear of flying or technical issues ñ the
following websites have the answer to your questions.

www.airlinesafety.com

A
US site run by an ex-pilot, this easy to navigate site is full of news and
opinions on all aspects of flight safety from runway incursions through to the
rudder design faults on the Boeing 737. A clickdown menu and search function
gives swift access to features and further links and a useful Frequently Asked
Questions section offers help to conquer flying phobias, lays some urban myths
to rest and answers pertinent questions to headline grabbing incidents.
Regularly updated, and offering the chance to sign up to be informed of future
updates, the site offers an inside/informed opinion on the issues, although one
editorial on the archive calls for the invasion of Afghanistan.

Rating
2/5

www.AviationCRM.com

CRM
stands for Crew Resource Management and this is the website of a Florida-based
company offering training to deal with human factors on corporate flights.
Covering the needs of pilots and flight staff for all two-pilot aircraft, the
training includes issues such as conflict resolution, stress reduction, threat
and error management. The company also offers aviation safety consultation
services and can act as expert witness, take part in accident investigations as
well as training organisations in safety audit processes. An up-to-date diary
of forthcoming courses for individuals based at Fort Lauderdale is included,
but the company offer bespoke courses to organisations at any location.
Functional and specialist for corporate flight organisations.

Rating
2/5

www.faa.gov

In
1998, the Federal Aviation Administration committed itself to the aim of
reducing the number of fatal accidents by 80 per cent on 1996 levels by 2007.
Its home page makes no mention of whether it is on its way to achieving this,
but it does devote an entire section to safety and security, ranging from
training courses to information on incidents occurring over the past 10 days.
Follow the links or go to www.faa.gov/AviationSafety/index.htm to access press
releases, the quarterly enforcement report database – recording violations of
aviation laws and regulations by airlines – and details of the FAA’s Aviation
Safety Program and awards. In addition, there is a Fly Smart Guide at
www.faa.gov/apa/traveler.htm which gives advice for every flyer from what to
wear to what not to pack. The site also links with an up to date online version
of FAAviation News, a bi-monthly magazine packed with news and information.

Rating
4/5

www.aviation.dtlr.gov.uk

With
the straightforward and no frills approach of many UK Government websites, the
aviation section of the Department for Transport and Local Regions site offers
information as well as a gateway to other sources concerning flight
information. The sector is responsible for 180,000 UK jobs and contributes
£10.2bn to the UK economy, although it is unclear whether these figures have
been re-evaluated in the light of recent events.

However,
with links to UK travel online, flyers can find out about current delays or
incidents which may affect their plans. Aim your browser at
www.aviation.dtlr.gov.uk/transec/index.htm for information on training
resources, and even how to become a recognised training resource via TRANSEC,
the Transport Security Division of the DTLR. This page is not immediately
accessible via the main aviation site (we stumbled across it under the ‘Advice
to Passengers’ article) but it does carry information on security training in
maritime, rail and even the Channel Tunnel.

Rating
3/5

www.caa.co.uk

The
Civil Aviation Authority has a consultancy and training arm known as the Safety
Regulation Group. The SRG is responsible for ensuring the standards of
aircraft, flight crew, Air Traffic Control and all licensed aerodromes. Safety
forms one of the five areas of the CAA’s website. This colourful and
sophisticated site has pop-up menus a-plenty and a seemingly infinite amount of
information on the airline industry including access to the register of
aircraft and aircraft mortgages. However, it is the International Services
section which carries information on training courses available. Delivering in
more than 140 countries, courses include specific areas such as English
language programmes for aviation as well as more general programmes in fire and
rescue training, maintenance and flight operations. There is an up-to-date
diary of scheduled courses but bespoke programmes can be arranged through the
‘Contact Us’ form.

Rating
4/5

www.fsbti.com

In
March 1997, FlightSafety International and Boeing joined forces to become
FlightSafetyBoeing. Offering courses in flight and technical areas, the company
has 70 flight simulators, working from 20 locations in nine countries across
five continents. Courses are available in locations as diverse as Manchester,
Mexico City and Miami. The website is commercial and easy to navigate, if
lacking in ‘current issue’ focus. There is a searchable catalogue of courses
including those provided through books and videotapes with details of
length/running time for each course and the opportunity to order online.
Alternatively, you can take a virtual 360 degree tour of the cockpits of three
Boeing simulators.

Rating
3/5

www.flightsafety.org

Established
in 1947, the Flight Safety Foundation is proud of its international history.
Visitors should sign up for an ID and password to access the full wealth of
information, reports and services offered online. The Foundation offers audit
services, training and safety programme design and development, runs seminars
across the world and this site offers further links to yet more online
publications from Helicopter Safety to Human Factors and Aviation Medicine.
Almost too full of resources and information, the site can occasionally be
tricky to navigate – the selection of sub-menus is something of a knack – but
if there is something going on in flight safety, you can be sure it is covered
somewhere here.

Rating
4/5

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