Hypnosis a power tool, not a game

• I was interested to read Steve Miller’s comments in your feature on Voodoo HR about using hypnosis in the training arena.

I too employ hypnotherapy techniques – both for positive visualisations and as part of a variety of exercises I use to demonstrate the power of the subconscious mind.

I use hypnosis with both private clients and corporate groups, and I would take issue with the suggestion that hypnosis is “playing with others’ minds”.

No one can implant suggestions in another individual, without their agreement – tacit or otherwise. Any attempt to violate a client’s values will result in an “immediate awakening”, with the client subsequently choosing to have nothing more to do with the hypnotist.

It is for this reason that I spend time with clients in order for them to express their values, determine for themselves what changes need to be made, and for what purpose, before beginning a hypnosis session.

Everyone should also be aware that no one can “do” hypnosis to someone else, as all hypnosis is ultimately self-hypnosis. Equally importantly, a client’s ability to go into deep trance is limited only by their ability to relax.

Each of us is in a light hypnotic trance several times a day – whether we are in deep concentration on a specific task or taking “time out” to think laterally. Anyone who has ever indulged in day-dreaming or has driven a familiar route from A to B and on arrival wondered how they got there, will know what I am talking about.

Our subconscious mind drives us – whether we are aware of it or not. Making the effort to programme our minds so they focus on what we want, and not on what we don’t want must be the most empowering exercise possible.

Olivia Stefanino

Managing director

Eklektika

Spelling out Acas’ recognition role

• I write with reference to your news story “CAC’s mediation role called into question” (13 June).

The article omits to explain the continuing role of Acas in providing an independent and impartial service for the voluntary resolution of recognition disputes.

Our conciliation service is available both as an alternative to and during the course of the statutory procedure, providing both parties wish to involve Acas in seeking to achieve a voluntary settlement.

I would stress that the Acas role is separate to the statutory decision-making role of the CAC and is, of course, entirely confidential.

For our part, Acas will continue to provide conciliation for the voluntary resolution of recognition issues as we have for the past 25 years. Acas has conciliated in well over 100 cases per year, on average, throughout the 1990s. In the past 12 months however, we have handled over 200 recognition cases reflecting the planned introduction of the new statutory procedure.

Derek Evans

Chief conciliator

Advisory, Conciliation &

Arbitration Service

Unions’ positive input in question

• I read with interest John Lloyd’s column telling us of the added value that the new, remodelled, repackaged trade unions are going to give us (13 June).

As he says, it is true that some organisations manage to be effective working with unions. But with respect, I think Coca-Cola would still do alright without union “help”.

However, many others are not doing so well, and the problems exhibited in many of our more traditional organisations are not helped by trade union truculence and resistance to change. This is not the 1970s we are talking about – it is today.

While being a strong advocate of the involvement of employees in the development of organisations, I feel there are very few examples where unions have made a positive contribution as described by John, except in the way that they make work for some HR managers.

Mike Haffenden

By e-mail

Hypnosis a power tool, not a game

• I was interested to read Steve Miller’s comments in your feature on Voodoo HR about using hypnosis in the training arena.

I too employ hypnotherapy techniques – both for positive visualisations and as part of a variety of exercises I use to demonstrate the power of the subconscious mind.

I use hypnosis with both private clients and corporate groups, and I would take issue with the suggestion that hypnosis is “playing with others’ minds”.

No one can implant suggestions in another individual, without their agreement – tacit or otherwise. Any attempt to violate a client’s values will result in an “immediate awakening”, with the client subsequently choosing to have nothing more to do with the hypnotist.

It is for this reason that I spend time with clients in order for them to express their values, determine for themselves what changes need to be made, and for what purpose, before beginning a hypnosis session.

Everyone should also be aware that no one can “do” hypnosis to someone else, as all hypnosis is ultimately self-hypnosis. Equally importantly, a client’s ability to go into deep trance is limited only by their ability to relax.

Each of us is in a light hypnotic trance several times a day – whether we are in deep concentration on a specific task or taking “time out” to think laterally. Anyone who has ever indulged in day-dreaming or has driven a familiar route from A to B and on arrival wondered how they got there, will know what I am talking about.

Our subconscious mind drives us – whether we are aware of it or not. Making the effort to programme our minds so they focus on what we want, and not on what we don’t want must be the most empowering exercise possible.

Olivia Stefanino

Managing director

Eklektika

Spelling out Acas’ recognition role

• I write with reference to your news story “CAC’s mediation role called into question” (13 June).

The article omits to explain the continuing role of Acas in providing an independent and impartial service for the voluntary resolution of recognition disputes.

Our conciliation service is available both as an alternative to and during the course of the statutory procedure, providing both parties wish to involve Acas in seeking to achieve a voluntary settlement.

I would stress that the Acas role is separate to the statutory decision-making role of the CAC and is, of course, entirely confidential.

For our part, Acas will continue to provide conciliation for the voluntary resolution of recognition issues as we have for the past 25 years. Acas has conciliated in well over 100 cases per year, on average, throughout the 1990s. In the past 12 months however, we have handled over 200 recognition cases reflecting the planned introduction of the new statutory procedure.

Derek Evans

Chief conciliator

Advisory, Conciliation &

Arbitration Service

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