More white police officers are claiming discrimination

An
increasing number of white police officers are taking legal action for alleged
discrimination in the wake of efforts by some forces to recruit and promote
members of ethnic minorities.

The
level of resentment among white officers has been identified during the Morris
inquiry, which was set up six months ago by the Metropolitan police after two
high-profile cases of victimisation against black officers threatened to damage
black recruitment.

The
inquiry has heard that half of the 15 race-related employment tribunal cases
being handled by the Met involved white officers, according to the Observer.

Evidence
from the inquiry suggests that attempts to hire more black officers in the wake
of the McPherson report into the murder of Stephen Lawrence have aggrieved all
sides, the newspaper said.

The
Nottinghamshire branch of the National Black Police Association reported that
six white officers were claiming discrimination after an Asian sergeant was
promoted.

In
a series of anonymous interviews made by the inquiry at Met stations, one white
officer quoted in the Observer said: "The perception is that black
officers are only getting a promotion because they are black."

The
Met has a target of 25 per cent of the force coming from ethnic minorities by 2009,
which would reflect London’s
ethnic mix. At present, the percentage is 6.5, but the target is widely seen as
unattainable.

By Daniel Thomas

 

 

 

 

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