Survey reveals how society has changed for the better

People
born in the 1970s are better educated and earn more money on average than their
counterparts who were raised in the 1960s, yet they are more prone to
depression.

Research
for the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, compared results from the National Child Development
Study that has followed more than 10,000 children born in 1958 with data from
the 1970 Cohort Study.

The
study shows that more than half of those born in 1958 left school at the
minimum age, mostly moving to jobs and apprenticeships.

By
the time those born in 1970 could leave school, the youth labour market in many
parts of the country had collapsed.

Earnings
for people born in 1970 were, on average, higher in real terms than those born
in 1958, but increases were not shared evenly.

The
study shows that those born in 1970 were more likely to suffer from depression
– especially young women.

www.jrf.org.uk

By Quentin Reade

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