In brief

This week’s
news in brief…

HR director leaves

The personnel and services
director of the Arcadia Group, which owns Dorothy Perkins and Top Shop, has
resigned. Keith Cameron, 52, is expected to receive a £300,000 pay-off after
the termination of his one-year contract. Chief executive Stuart Rose said the
move was amicable and that Cameron left so he could "think about his
life".

Bank axes 500
posts

Deutsche Bank is to shed 500
jobs in the City of London after a 34 per cent rise in operating costs last
year. The cuts are part of a global streamlining that will cut Deutsche’s
workforce of 90,000 by 2,600.

The cuts are expected to fall
on the back office and administration divisions and come just days after ING
Barings announced 500 redundancies in the City.

http://www.deutsche-bank.com/

Union in strike
talks

Air traffic controllers are to
vote on whether to take strike action if the Government does not change its
plans to privatise the service. Iain Findlay, of the controllers’ union the
IPMS, said members have agreed to hold a ballot if ministers refuse to consider
alternatives to the scheme. He said, "Members say it is impossible to
consider profit and safety in the same equation."

http://www.ipms.org.uk/

Ford’s £220m
scheme

Ford will create more than 600
jobs with a £220m investment programme. The company, which ends car assembly at
its Dagenham plant next year, is ploughing the money into new engine facilities
at its Bridgend plant, in South Wales. The investment was helped by £16m from
the Welsh Assembly.

link  http://www.ford.com/

Directive
challenged

A European Court of Justice
opinion could have serious implications for employers of short-term workers.
BECTU, which brought a case against the UK Government, says the Working Time
regulation 13(7) is incompatible with the Working Time Directive. It means
contract workers will be entitled to paid holiday and it will apply if the ECJ
rules that the regulation is unlawful.

http://www.europa.eu.int/

Protest over TV
pay

More than 300 staff at Carlton
TV are balloting for industrial action in protest against a 2.5 per cent annual
pay rise. Broadcasting union BECTU and the NUJ are campaigning for pay rises in
line with inflation and a guaranteed £1,000 for employees at Birmingham and
Abingdon.

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