…in brief

Eurotunnel has announced a single union deal on recognition and partnership with the Transport and General Workers’ Union. The voluntary agreement, which applies to all UK staff, recognises the union for collective bargaining and will see further discussions held on training, equal opportunities, and health and safety.

NHS staff check-up

The Government has announced a confidential national database to record the concerns of NHS staff about poorly-performing colleagues. The aim of the database will be to help managers identify healthcare staff whose consistently poor quality work puts patients at risk. The initiative follows the case of gynaecologist Rodney Ledward whose incompetence went unchecked for many years because colleagues were too scared to report him.

BAE axes 3,800 jobs

Defence contractor BAE Systems is to axe 3,800 UK white collar and production jobs. The job cuts follow last year’s merger of British Aerospace and Marconi Electronic Systems. BAE said at the time it would be looking for savings of more than £250m. Nearly a thousand jobs will go in East Yorkshire with 750 also being cut at two sites near Preston.

Lagging behind in IT

A survey has revealed that 40 per cent of organisations are not using a computerised HR system. The survey of 93 HR and pay professionals was conducted by the Internet company Softworld at a conference in February. Respondents were surveyed to determine the purpose of their visit, purchasing incentives and how organisations are using technology within the HR and payroll arena.

Keep staff to keep up

British firms need to retrain surplus staff in IT and think more about people issues to keep pace with the e-business revolution, research has revealed. BT CEO Sir Peter Bonfield revealed the findings by BT Syncordia Solutions at a summit earlier this month. Seventy per cent of companies surveyed said they had not considered the impact of e-business on their staff.

Unfinished business

Due to a production error the final paragraph of Robbie Gilbert’s Opinion piece last week was cut short. It should have read, “DTI officials haven’t begun to consult about impending laws on fixed term work. Why? Because they’re so busy with part-time work. President Gerald Ford was once accused of not being able to walk and chew gum at the same time. Such honest simplicity was a welcome relief after ‘Tricky Dicky’ Nixon. But it’s no way to run the Department of Trade and Industry in today’s global marketplace”. The chief executive of the Employers Forum on Statute and Practice can be contacted on 020-7919 4871 or whitlon@eversheds.com

Eurotunnel has announced a single union deal on recognition and partnership with the Transport and General Workers’ Union. The voluntary agreement, which applies to all UK staff, recognises the union for collective bargaining and will see further discussions held on training, equal opportunities, and health and safety.

NHS staff check-up

The Government has announced a confidential national database to record the concerns of NHS staff about poorly-performing colleagues. The aim of the database will be to help managers identify healthcare staff whose consistently poor quality work puts patients at risk. The initiative follows the case of gynaecologist Rodney Ledward whose incompetence went unchecked for many years because colleagues were too scared to report him.

BAE axes 3,800 jobs

Defence contractor BAE Systems is to axe 3,800 UK white collar and production jobs. The job cuts follow last year’s merger of British Aerospace and Marconi Electronic Systems. BAE said at the time it would be looking for savings of more than £250m. Nearly a thousand jobs will go in East Yorkshire with 750 also being cut at two sites near Preston.

Lagging behind in IT

A survey has revealed that 40 per cent of organisations are not using a computerised HR system. The survey of 93 HR and pay professionals was conducted by the Internet company Softworld at a conference in February. Respondents were surveyed to determine the purpose of their visit, purchasing incentives and how organisations are using technology within the HR and payroll arena.

Keep staff to keep up

British firms need to retrain surplus staff in IT and think more about people issues to keep pace with the e-business revolution, research has revealed. BT CEO Sir Peter Bonfield revealed the findings by BT Syncordia Solutions at a summit earlier this month. Seventy per cent of companies surveyed said they had not considered the impact of e-business on their staff.

Unfinished business

Due to a production error the final paragraph of Robbie Gilbert’s Opinion piece last week was cut short. It should have read, “DTI officials haven’t begun to consult about impending laws on fixed term work. Why? Because they’re so busy with part-time work. President Gerald Ford was once accused of not being able to walk and chew gum at the same time. Such honest simplicity was a welcome relief after ‘Tricky Dicky’ Nixon. But it’s no way to run the Department of Trade and Industry in today’s global marketplace”. The chief executive of the Employers Forum on Statute and Practice can be contacted on 020-7919 4871 or whitlon@eversheds.com

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