Temporary employment

Temporary agency workers offer great flexibility as an additional labour resource. They can fill in staffing gaps, often at very short notice, and can be engaged for anything from a few hours to weeks or months at a time.

Under the Agency Workers Regulations 2010, on completing a qualifying period with a hirer, agency workers qualify for the same basic employment conditions that they would have had if directly recruited.

If an employer wishes to take on an agency worker as a permanent member of staff, it may have to pay a “transfer fee” (sometimes known as a “temp to perm” fee) to the agency supplying the worker.


New rights for agency and temporary workers revealed

New legislation to bolster workers’ rights, including an extension of the right to a written statement of entitlements and closing...

2019 employment law: eight changes to look out for

12 Dec 2018

Although Brexit dominates the news, there will be a number of important employment law developments in 2019. Clio Springer sets...

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Half of employers don’t know that many unpaid internships are illegal

23 Nov 2018

As many as half of employers are not aware that most unpaid internships are likely to be illegal, research has...

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Three things to consider when hiring Christmas temps

21 Nov 2018

With the festive season almost upon us, and the Black Friday sales beginning this week, many employers are looking for...

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2019 RAD Awards shortlist unveiled

20 Nov 2018

The shortlist for the 2019 RAD Awards, which celebrate the brightest and bravest in recruitment advertising, has been announced.
The...

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When should we pay commission to employment agencies?

31 Aug 2018

The Conduct of Employment Agencies & Business Regulations are still causing headaches, 15 years after they were introduced. Ally Tow...

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Vacancies and salaries enjoy “summer bounce”, says REC

8 Aug 2018

Vacancies for both permanent and temporary staff increased at the quickest rate for eight months in July, according to the...

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Most employers back idea for stable contract requests

1 Jun 2018

Two-thirds of employers back the introduction of a right for agency workers and zero-hours contract workers to request a stable...

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Seasonal workers: key contractual issues for employers

29 Aug 2017

In sectors such as hospitality, tourism, retail and agriculture, seasonal peaks can bring an influx of work at certain times...

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The Taylor Review: what employers need to know

11 Jul 2017

The long-awaited Taylor Review of modern employment practices emerged today, introduced at a press conference hosted by Prime Minister Theresa...

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Skills shortages cost businesses more than £2 billion, says Open University

3 Jul 2017

Severe skills shortages in the UK cost businesses more than £2 billion in higher salaries, recruitment costs and temporary staff...

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Digital HR: Leaders look for more investment as pace of change grows

20 Jun 2017

HR leaders are keen to invest in tools that will digitise HR but at the same time struggle to keep...

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Zero hours workers assume no entitlement to paid holiday

9 May 2017

Half of people on zero hours contracts wrongly believe that they are not entitled to paid holidays, research by Citizens...

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Candidate availability hits a 16-month low, says REC

9 May 2017

The UK jobs market has experienced its steepest drop in candidate availability for 16 months, according to the Recruitment and...

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Nurses and teachers choose agency work for better work-life balance, report finds

23 Feb 2017

Teachers and nurses are choosing to work through agencies because they are disillusioned with permanent work, research has found.
A...

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