Immigration

Employers must ensure that individuals who are recruited have the legal right to work in the UK. Employers cannot employ an individual who is subject to immigration control and who has not been granted leave to enter or remain in the UK, or does not have permission to work in the UK.

All potential employees are required to provide evidence of entitlement to work in the UK. Requests for documentation should therefore be applied to all potential employees, not just those coming from abroad.

Employers are liable for fines for negligently employing illegal workers and can be prosecuted under the criminal offence of knowingly employing illegal workers.


Migration Advisory Committee recommendations: Do the claims stand up?

Last month, the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) released its interim report on EEA workers in the UK labour market. Karen...

GDPR deadline looms: Are your immigration data processes compliant?

13 Mar 2018

Most employers will be aware of the upcoming introduction of the General Data Protection Regulation, or GDPR. But how can...

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Brexit and immigration: At last some progress on citizens’ rights

2 Mar 2018

The immigration question has loomed over Brexit negotiations for some time now, but a policy paper published by Theresa May’s...

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EU migrants to receive right to settle during Brexit transition

28 Feb 2018

The Government has changed its position on the rights of EU migrants arriving during the Brexit transition period and will...

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corbyn 26 february 2018

Corbyn puts jobs and skills at heart of new Labour Brexit policy

26 Feb 2018

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has shifted the party’s stance on Brexit, spelling out how a Government under him would ensure...

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Number of EU citizens leaving UK highest since 2008

22 Feb 2018

The number of EU citizens leaving the UK has reached its highest point since 2008, according to the latest migration...

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Theresa May: End freedom of movement the day the UK leaves the EU

1 Feb 2018

Theresa May is calling for freedom of movement for EU citizens to end on the day the UK formally leaves...

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Brexit: Revised transition terms could extend freedom of movement

16 Jan 2018

Revised guidelines on the UK’s exit from the EU suggest that the EU will toughen up its transition terms –...

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Beware of winter delays when sponsoring tier 2 general workers

11 Jan 2018

Employers wishing to sponsor non-EEA nationals under tier 2 (general) this winter should be aware that there is no guarantee...

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EU citizens’ rights confirmed in Brexit agreement

8 Dec 2017

EU citizens living in the UK and vice versa will have their rights to live, work and study protected it...

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Time running out for Brexit migration consultation

24 Oct 2017

With this Friday’s deadline to contribute towards the call for evidence from the Migration Advisory Committee, Jackie Penlington looks at...

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Employers “sleepwalking” on right-to-work compliance for overseas workers

28 Sep 2017

Less than a third of companies are aware of the sanctions for failing to secure right-to-work documentation for overseas workers...

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Residency limits proposed for EU migrants in leaked Brexit plan

6 Sep 2017

A detailed 82-page Home Office document proposes to offer low-skilled EU migrants a maximum of two years’ residency in a...

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Government asks committee to look into post-Brexit immigration

27 Jul 2017

The Government has commissioned an in-depth report into how immigration will be managed after Brexit.
Home secretary Amber Rudd has...

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Formal proposals for EU citizen status unveiled

26 Jun 2017

Prime Minister Theresa May has formally outlined her proposals to allow EU citizens to remain in the UK once the...

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