Gig economy

The “gig economy” refers to a trend away from traditional employment models towards the use of freelance contractors to fulfil short-term projects or “gigs”. It is becoming increasingly prevalent with the advent of technologies that allow freelancers to bid for or otherwise engage clients on a piecemeal basis. Uber, Airbnb and Upwork are all examples of disruptive technologies that are putting clients in touch with service providers in real-time online marketplaces. These pages cover the “Uberisation” of the economy and the employment status of so-called “gig workers”.

Gig economy drivers on collision course with GDPR

Some of the major names in the development of the gig economy − such as Deliveroo, Pimlico Plumbers and Uber...

Taxation system similar to PAYE proposed for gig economy workers

23 Jul 2018

The Office for Tax Simplification (OTS) has suggested gig economy firms should deduct tax from the earnings of self-employed workers...

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Workplace health ‘in the fourth industrial revolution’

6 Jul 2018

The second annual Health and Safety Executive lecture took place in April. This year’s speaker was Dr Richard Heron, chief...

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Deliveroo riders win six-figure settlement over pay and rights

29 Jun 2018

Fifty Deliveroo riders are to receive a share in a six-figure settlement after they claimed they had been unlawfully denied...

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How employee benefits can keep gig workers engaged

27 Jun 2018

As more organisations choose to use ‘gig’ workers, the workforce is becoming increasingly isolated. But how do employers keep them...

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Hermes drivers ruled as workers, not self-employed

25 Jun 2018

An employment tribunal has ruled that a group of Hermes couriers are workers, rather than self-employed.

Employment status
Amazon delivery...

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From Uber to Deliveroo via Pimlico: The search for clarity on the gig economy

22 Jun 2018

In recent cases it has become apparent that Uber, City Sprint, Deliveroo and Pimlico Plumbers had each created contracts that purported to ensure that their “partners” – the drivers, cyclists and plumbers – were classed as “self employed”

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Employment regs: what happened to the ones that got away?

20 Jun 2018

Keeping on top of employment law developments can feel like a full-time job for HR professionals, but that’s just the...

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Union wins go ahead for Deliveroo collective bargaining case

15 Jun 2018

A High Court judge today granted permission for Deliveroo couriers to challenge a previous ruling that they could not be...

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Taxes and the gig economy: what should employers expect?

14 Jun 2018

The Supreme Court this week deemed a former Pimlico plumber a worker for employment rights purposes, even though he was...

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Pimlico Plumbers worker wins Supreme Court battle

13 Jun 2018

In a key gig economy case decision, the Supreme Court has decided that a plumber who brought a case against...

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Courier deliver driver

Amazon delivery firms in employment status fight

4 Jun 2018

The GMB has announced that it will take legal action against three Amazon delivery companies over their classification of drivers...

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Uber to give drivers medical cover, sick pay and other benefits

24 May 2018

Uber is to introduce numerous protections for its drivers through a new insurance scheme, including sick pay and maternity and...

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Could universal basic income ever take off in the UK?

22 May 2018

Universal basic income has been described as everything between a utopian ideal and “dangerous nonsense”, but with a trial due...

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Deliveroo plans to make permanent staff shareholders

17 May 2018

Deliveroo has announced that it will make all permanent staff shareholders, in a move worth around £10m.

Gig economy
MPs...

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