Gig economy

The “gig economy” refers to a trend away from traditional employment models towards the use of freelance contractors to fulfil short-term projects or “gigs”. It is becoming increasingly prevalent with the advent of technologies that allow freelancers to bid for or otherwise engage clients on a piecemeal basis. Uber, Airbnb and Upwork are all examples of disruptive technologies that are putting clients in touch with service providers in real-time online marketplaces. These pages cover the “Uberisation” of the economy and the employment status of so-called “gig workers”.

Employees keen to get to grips with future of work

Companies need to do more to prepare employees for the future of work – but employees have a “keen sense...

Amazon offers workers thousands to set up own delivery businesses

14 May 2019

Amazon is offering its employees thousands of pounds in funding to set up independent delivery businesses.
The company has said...

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Uber not complying with GDPR requests say drivers

7 May 2019

Uber drivers are threatening to take legal action over claims the company has refused to disclose the personal data it...

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Addison Lee drivers strike over ‘below minimum wage’ pay

1 May 2019

The first ever strike involving Addison Lee drivers takes place today (1 May), when drivers operating from Luton Airport take...

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }
woman gazing out of modern office

What challenges will HR face in the next 10 years?

29 Apr 2019

Making predictions for the workplace is fraught with risk but Emma Shipp and Lynne Adams take a punt on technological change, new legislation, societal trends and, yes, Brexit, to lay out the likely challenges...

Continue Reading Comments { 1 }

Pimlico’s Charlie Mullins: Gig economy reform needed, but don’t vilify us

10 Apr 2019

The name Pimlico Plumbers has become synonymous with the gig economy and workers’ rights over the past eight years. And...

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Addison Lee refused permission to appeal worker status ruling

1 Apr 2019

Addison Lee has been denied permission to appeal against the ruling that its drivers are workers and not self-employed.
It...

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Courts should fast-track gig economy cases: Frank Field

25 Mar 2019

The exploitation of workers must be tackled quickly and effectively, MP Frank Field has recommended in a new report critical of the length of time cases are taking.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Pimlico Plumbers worker loses his claim for £74,000 in holiday pay

21 Mar 2019

An engineer who won a Supreme Court case against Pimlico Plumbers – establishing that he was a worker and not...

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Online activism in the workplace: how should HR respond?

12 Mar 2019

Technology has revolutionised the way many people organise their work and created a debate around employee status. But it is...

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Recruitment process outsourcing: the future is ‘total talent’

6 Mar 2019

Employers are battling economic uncertainty but still struggle to source much-needed skills. In such a volatile jobs market, what role...

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

National Gallery lecturers win ‘worker’ status

1 Mar 2019

A group of art lecturers who lost their jobs at the National Gallery have won their legal fight to be recognised as workers, allowing them to claim certain employment benefits such as holiday pay.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

Freelancer platforms add to global work insecurity

1 Mar 2019

The hiring of workers anywhere in the world through global freelancer platforms means that limiting immigration will not necessarily protect...

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }

The Good Work Plan: how should employers prepare?

20 Feb 2019

In December 2018, the government set out the reforms it planned to introduce as part of the Good Work Plan,...

Continue Reading Comments { 1 }

New tech threatens global labour market improvements

15 Feb 2019

Emerging tech-driven business models are partly to blame for millions of people worldwide being forced to accept inadequate working conditions, according to research.

Continue Reading Comments { 0 }