Notice periods

Employers must give employees with between one month and two years’ service a minimum of one week’s notice to terminate their employment. Thereafter, an employer must give a minimum notice period of one week per completed year of service, up to a maximum of 12 weeks. If the contract of employment specifies a longer notice period, the employer should give the contractual notice.

An employee must give one week’s notice to terminate his or her contract of employment. If the contract of employment specifies a longer notice period, the employee should give the contractual notice.

Employers will often pay an employee who resigns or is dismissed in lieu of his or her notice period.


Notice periods no longer covered by furlough

HM Treasury has confirmed that statutory and contractual notice periods will not be covered by the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme...

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2 Oct 2020

As the number of coronavirus (Covid-19) cases rose in the last month, employers have been asking questions about testing for...

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Arcadia agrees to pay furloughed staff full notice pay

14 Sep 2020

Topshop and Dorothy Perkins owner Arcadia Group has agreed to pay full salaries to staff facing redundancy, after it emerged...

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Arcadia wrongly basing notice pay on furlough payments, staff claim

25 Aug 2020

Employees facing redundancy say the firm is basing notice pay on furlough payments.

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Furloughed employees must receive redundancy in full

30 Jul 2020

Furloughed employees will be entitled to redundancy pay based on their normal wages, not their furlough rate, from tomorrow (31...

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Furlough funds can be used for contractual notice periods

17 Jul 2020

Funds claimed from the government’s Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme can be used to pay for notice periods that go above...

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Calculating notice pay for employees on furlough

29 Apr 2020

The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) was created at such speed that it created many unanswered questions. The government has...

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Secretary who resigned because of discrimination was constructively dismissed

18 Feb 2020

A secretary who resigned because she was asked to be complicit in discriminatory recruitment practices was constructively and unfairly dismissed,...

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Top 10 HR questions August 2019: term-time holiday calculations

3 Sep 2019

How should you calculate holiday pay for a term-time worker without regular hours?
A recent Court of Appeal decision, The...

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Businesses may need to compensate workers facing cancelled shifts

19 Jul 2019

The government has announced new proposals of compensation for workers when their shift is cancelled at short notice

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Top 10 HR questions June 2019: Ex-employee grievances

2 Jul 2019

Can an employer ignore a grievance if the employee no longer works for the organisation?
The most popular FAQ on...

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Top 10 HR questions April 2019: Maximum compensation, holiday entitlement and positive action

2 May 2019

The annual increase to the limits on compensation that can be awarded in an...

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Top 10 HR questions January 2019: Holiday pay, overtime and tax on exit payments

1 Feb 2019

How should employers deal with overtime when calculating holiday pay? Does it make a difference if the overtime is voluntary,...

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Top 10 HR questions September 2018 – probation dismissals and unavailable companions

2 Oct 2018

Can you dismiss before a probationary period ends if they're not up to the job?

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Top 10 HR questions May 2018: GDPR special category data

1 Jun 2018

Many HR professionals will have spent months preparing for the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). Now it is finally in...

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