Staff monitoring

Employers commonly monitor employees’ behaviour in the workplace to ensure that rules are not being broken and employees are acting appropriately while representing the employer.

Common methods of monitoring staff include recording employees’ activities on CCTV, checking emails, listening to voicemails and monitoring telephone conversations.

Employers should inform employees that monitoring is taking place, how data is being collected, how the data will be securely processed and the purpose for which the data will be used. Employee will usually be entitled to see data that has been collected about them. In exceptional circumstances, the organisation may use monitoring covertly (for example, to catch a thief).


Lloyds Bank says staff will be working at home until spring at least

Lloyds Bank's has told most of its UK employees not to return to the office until at least spring.

Why home workers who are ill should not work

22 Oct 2020

With the onset of colder weather, inevitably the number of people with common colds and flu will rise, in addition...

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City traders working from home must be monitored

13 Oct 2020

A City watchdog has warned financial services firms that it expects them to have updated their policies, refreshed their training...

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BBC-gender-pay

Employers watch BBC’s social media struggles with interest

1 Oct 2020

Legal expert says BBC's new impartiality drive has lessons for businesses worried over brand damage from employees' posts.

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‘All views my own’: Monitoring employees’ social media

18 Aug 2020

Social media has grown in use exponentially since Facebook was launched 16 years ago, and so has the risk to...

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PwC facial recognition tool criticised for home working privacy invasion

16 Jun 2020

Accounting giant PwC has come under fire for the development of a facial recognition tool that logs when employees are...

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Scientists urge caution over availability of antibody tests

21 May 2020

Scientists have warned of the risks associated with the widespread use of antibody tests by employees and the wider public,...

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Remote working: key considerations for junior employees’ development

1 Apr 2020

Employers need to establish clear processes, monitor the quality of work and provide timely feedback if they are to effectively...

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Coronavirus: What employers need to know (webinar)

19 Mar 2020

ON-DEMAND | As the true impact of the Covid-19 coronavirus pandemic becomes apparent, employers are facing...

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Barclays abandons ‘creepy’ people analytics project

20 Feb 2020

Barclays has scrapped the use of an employee monitoring platform following a backlash from staff and criticism from privacy professionals...

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The 10 most important employment law cases in 2019

11 Dec 2019

We round up the most significant cases of the year including legal judgments on CCTV, restrictive covenants, enhancing shared parental leave, collective bargaining and more...

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Spanish supermarket covert surveillance did not violate human rights

17 Oct 2019

The European Court of Human Rights has overturned a previous judgment it made in the case of López Ribalda and...

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Google releases strict guidelines on employee communications

28 Aug 2019

Google has released new workplace guidelines urging staff not to insult one another or make misleading comments about the company....

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Court of Appeal: Junior doctor wins rest break test case

31 Jul 2019

The NHS faces a bill of millions of pounds after a junior doctor won a test case yesterday about the...

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data privacy

Privacy: what data can employers collect from company-issued tech?

26 Jul 2019

Employers could be collecting personal data from company tech.

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